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Why don’t we remember Final Fantasy 6?

Why don’t we remember Final Fantasy 6?

I recently finished playing Final Fantasy VI, and I’m shocked that people tend to regard and remember Chrono Trigger better than its predecessor. In this article, I try to figure out why Chrono Trigger was so much more memorable than Final Fantasy VI.

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The Importance of the Smartphones’ Ubiquity

The Importance of the Smartphones’ Ubiquity

This entry is part 4 of David’s series on The Future of Gaming. Click for parts 1, 2 or 3. In our last entry, we covered why exactly the App Store paradigm is one of the chief factors behind the present revolution in gaming, and how the paradigm is certain to be a part of any vision of what the future of gaming will look like. It’s difficult to imagine a system winning that once again limits development to big names, so long as there is a quality assurance system in place (unlike the trend that doomed the Atari in the early 1980s), and most instantiations of the App Store paradigm have something like that available. We’ve already seen this paradigm working its way into the console gaming industry. The Xbox 360 has its Xbox Live Arcade; the PlayStation 3 and PSP have their PlayStation Network; the Wii has Wii Shop; and the DS has DSiWare. You could even make a case that Steam is an instantiation of the App Store paradigm for PCs, and we know that Apple has created an App Store for its Macs as well. There’s not much question about the rise of that paradigm. However, that paradigm alone is not responsible for the iPhone’s success; rather, the more important factor behind it is what’s best referred to as its ubiquity. Ubiquity means that quality of being everywhere, of everyone having it. Having a ubiquitous platform on which to develop means a significantly larger audience, both in theory and in practice. You’ll notice that for this article, I’ve switched the title to Smartphones instead of iPhones, and that’s intentional: while the App Store paradigm is something best-observed in iPhones, this quality of ubiquity can be seen in smartphones of all kinds. It start with the most financial thing of all… Justifiably Higher Device Price One of the reasons the PlayStation 3 arguably flopped was because of its exorbitantly high device price of $600 upon its first release. Gaming is a hobby, and while the hardcore gamers might drop that kind of dough for the console, it’s not going to reach a large audience that way. Who wants to pay $600 for something that only plays games? But this is where the iPhone differentiates itself from all the other App Store copycats on the consoles. The iPhone does not only play games. It doesn’t even primarily play games. Sure, no one wants to spend $600 on a device that only plays games, but what about on a device that plays games, makes phone calls, surfs the internet, and — for all intents and purposes — is its own portable computer? The...

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The App Store: A New Marketplace Paradigm

The App Store: A New Marketplace Paradigm

Some might see the App Store as simply a new and simplified way to buy applications, but underneath it is a paradigm that promises to fundamentally change the marketplace for developers, retailers and consumers. This week, DDJ explains how this will work in the future.

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The Rise of the iPhone

The Rise of the iPhone

In the second part of his “The Future of Gaming” series, DDJ looks at the iPhone and how it poses a legitimate threat to Nintendo, Microsoft, and Sony. Through its amazing ubiquity and its brilliant business plan, could the iPhone (and other smartphones) ever prove to really cut into the big names’ market share?

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Introduction to the Future of Gaming

Introduction to the Future of Gaming

About three months ago, I made a bet with a labmate of mine. Just a small bet, one dollar, but a symbolic bet. The bet: In 15 years, you will not have a video game console in your house. Now, it’s not a bet that in 15 years, he would grow out of gaming. We’re in our mid 20s and working on doctorates — if we haven’t outgrown gaming by now, we’re never going to. No, this is a bet over the way in which the video game industry is growing and evolving; the way different technologies are emerging that are destined to grow together and create for us a future for the gaming industry that is very different than the industry of today. This is not just a technological revolution, however. It’s also a cultural one. Games, gaming, and who exactly is a ‘gamer’ are all changing. We’ve seen it happening, with the iPhone continuing what the Wii started in bring gaming back to the masses. We’ve seen the business changing, with independent developers putting out brilliantly innovative games at a mere fraction of the budget of their big-name counterparts. The cultural revolution is enabled by the technology, and in turn, the cultural revolution incentivizes further technological improvements. Take [amazon_link id=”B004HYG9C8″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Angry Birds[/amazon_link], for example. It isn’t tracked by sales sites like VGChartz and IGN, but humble little Angry Birds has quietly put the rest of the gaming industry to shame. With a budget of $100,000, this little iPhone puzzle game is the single best-selling game of all time. You don’t hear much about that, do you? All we’ve heard recently is about how [amazon_link id=”B0017Q4DGI” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Wii Sports[/amazon_link] had dethroned [amazon_link id=”B00004SVV7″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Super Mario Bros.[/amazon_link] as the best-selling game of all time, but meanwhile Angry Birds was putting those games to shame. This isn’t just about the casual gaming revolutionized facilitated by the iPhone and Wii, though. This goes much further. [amazon_link id=”B0057LS84M” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]OnLive[/amazon_link], hyped by some as the console killer (and mocked by others for failing to deliver on that promise) really is the future that it promised to be: maybe not under that brand name and maybe not in its current form, but in a world where everything is moving up into the almighty cloud, it’s only a matter of time before the paradigm that OnLive announced takes hold. But the iPhone and OnLive can never mimic the full-screen heavily multimedia experience that is modern gaming, can they? We’ll explore that question as this series goes on. The objective of this series is to look at how new and...

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A Detailed Look at Ocarina of Time’s Staying Power

A Detailed Look at Ocarina of Time’s Staying Power

A year ago, I wrote an analysis on how, even over a decade after its original release, Final Fantasy VII manages to say popular. Now, a year later, I’m examining another game that has seemingly insurmountable staying power: The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. What is it about this game that makes it as popular today as it was over ten years ago when it was released? In this analysis, I analyze the game’s progression, plot, and historical significance to answer this question.

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A Detailed Look at Final Fantasy VII’s Staying Power

A Detailed Look at Final Fantasy VII’s Staying Power

Recently, in a contest to determine the “Best. Game. Ever.”, Final Fantasy VII took the first prize. Final Fantasy VII has been out for over ten years, and yet it still took the prize for best game. How is this possible? Have video games not advanced at all in the past ten years? In this article, I analyze why Final Fantasy VII is still so popular. It’s not just about popularity, but rather about staying power. What has kept Final Fantasy VII popular all these years? Read this article to find out.

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